Wordbank's blog

18 November
2015

The PMM Phase 5: Transparent Clients

By Jenna Harding | Best Practices | Comments are off for this post

The PMM Phase 5: Transparent

For the past few weeks, we’ve been reviewing the various stages of the Project Management Maturity Model (PMM) and how it relates to the localization maturity levels of clients that require localization services. We’ve now come to the final phase of the PMM. In this post, we’ll discuss strategies for managing globalization with transparent clients. For a refresher on our recommendations for localization management with clients at earlier phases of maturity, please take a look at the previous posts in this series:

The PMM Phase 1: Reactive Clients

The PMM Phase 2: Repeatable Clients

The PMM Phase 3: Managed Clients

The PMM Phase 4: Optimized Clients

Understanding ‘transparent’ clients

According to the Common Sense Advisory (CSA), companies at the transparent phase of localization maturity have internalized globalization so that localization is part of the corporate DNA. This means their globalization strategies are fully aligned with broader corporate strategies. The primary goal of transparent clients is to meet the needs of their global customers in a truly authentic – seemingly unlocalized – way.
Read more

9 November
2015

The PMM Phase 4: Optimized Clients

By Jenna Harding | Best Practices | Comments are off for this post

PMM Phase 4: Optimized Clients

In this post, we’ll walk through project and translation management strategies for working with optimized clients, as defined by the Common Sense Advisory’s Localization Maturity Model (LMM). For a refresher on the earlier stages of the Project Management Maturity Model (PMM), please take a look at the previous posts in this series:

Introducing the Project Management Maturity Model

The PMM Phase 1: Reactive Clients

The PMM Phase 2: Repeatable Clients

The PMM Phase 3: Managed Clients

Understanding ‘optimized’ clients

According to the Common Sense Advisory (CSA), companies at the optimized level of localization maturity have highly evolved internal processes and take a scientific approach to localization. They like to collect detailed process, quality, and efficiency metrics and are looking for efficient, high-quality output from their localization ‘machine.’
Read more

3 November
2015

The PMM Phase 3: Managed Clients

By Jenna Harding | Best Practices | Comments are off for this post

PMM Phase 3: Managed Clients

By now we’ve walked through project and translation management strategies for working with both reactive and repeatable clients as part of our overview of the Project Management Maturity Model (PMM). In this post, we’ll discuss best practices in localization management when collaborating with managed clients.

Understanding ‘managed’ clients

According to the Common Sense Advisory (CSA), the managed phase of localization maturity tends to be a very transitionary phase, when clients are consistently evolving their global efforts and their approach to localization may move away from being fixed or stagnant. These clients tend to be larger multinational firms that have developed a managed, scalable approach to localization as part of their business strategy.
Read more

30 October
2015

The PMM Phase 2:
Repeatable Clients

By Jenna Harding | Best Practices | Comments are off for this post

PMM Phase 2: Repeatable Clients

In our previous Project Management Maturity Model (PMM) posts, we introduced the PMM and then walked through traditional project management and localization management recommendations for working with reactive clients. In this post, we’ll cover these strategies as they relate to repeatable clients.

Understanding ‘repeatable’ clients

According to the Common Sense Advisory, companies at the repeatable phase of localization maturity have some experience producing content for global markets, which means they have a basic understanding of what goes into localization. To help scale and meet an increase in global demand, these clients have established basic project management patterns that are repeated internally and with their language service provider (LSP) or internal localization team.
Read more

26 October
2015

The PMM Phase 1: Reactive Clients

By Jenna Harding | Best Practices | Comments are off for this post

PMM Phase 1: Reactive

As I mentioned in my previous post, Introducing the Project Management Maturity Model, in this blog series we’ll be defining ideal project manager (PM) characteristics, typical processes, recommended resource models, and considerations in technology use for localization management as they relate to each of the five phases of localization maturity (as defined by the Common Sense Advisory). Before we dive in, I want to clarify a few terms we’ll be using frequently throughout this series:

PM could apply to a project manager, senior project manager, or program manager, just depending on the structure of your organization or team.

Client could apply to an external client or company if you’re on the LSP side, or it could refer to internal stakeholders or divisions if you’re on an internal or enterprise localization team serving a non-language-focused organization.

Waterfall is used to describe a traditional approach to localization, where English source content must be completely final before translation can begin. Waterfall processes can take anywhere from a few days to months to execute and deliver.

Agile is used both in referring to the common approach to software and product development, and is also used in the traditional sense of the word to describe flexible, lithe processes.

Now let’s get into the meat of the PMM. We’ll start with the first phase of localization maturity.

Read more

13 October
2015

Introducing the Project Management Maturity Model

By Jenna Harding | Best Practices, Localization Marketplace, Uncategorized | Comments are off for this post

Project Management Maturity Evolution

About the Project Management
Maturity Model

In the localization industry, project management is a widely recognized term used to describe the effort involved in managing the end-to-end process of transforming content from one language, usually English, into one or more target languages. This transformation can occur in a variety of file formats and via a number of different systems or platforms.

To language service providers (LSPs), project management is a critical element in ensuring their clients receive a high-quality deliverable, while meeting expectations around cost and turnaround times. Project managers, therefore, must be adequately trained and highly skilled in order to be able to meet and exceed client expectations. Read more

5 October
2015

Fonts, fonts, glorious fonts

By Tracy Russell | Best Practices, Print & Typography | Comments are off for this post

Oliver_fontswirl

What wouldn’t we give for
That extra bit more
That’s all we live for
Why should we be fated to do
Nothing but brood on fonts
Magical fonts,
Wonderful fonts
Marvelous fonts,
Beautiful fonts,
Fonts, glorious fonts, glorious foooooooonts

What are we waiting for?………….FONTS!

 difference-between-a-font-and-a-typeface

Before I get started I need to just clarify terms. Should I be writing the word typeface and not font? Well after reading many blogs about the subject, fonts and typefaces are technically different though relate to the same thing.

  • Typeface
    • In typography, a typeface (also known as font family) is a set of one or more fonts each composed of glyphs that share common design features.
  • Font
    • Each font of a typeface has a specific weight, style, condensation, width, slant, italicization, ornamentation, and designer or foundry (and formerly size, in metal fonts).

However, I agree with blogger; John Brownlee from fastcodesign.com. “With the decline of metal blocks and analog printing and the rise of desktop publishing tools, fonts were no longer thousands of tiny blocks of movable type; they became digital computer files that scaled themselves up or down dynamically to whatever size or weight users wanted. So the distinction between process and end result disappeared. Open up Microsoft Word and you’re asked to choose a font, not a typeface. Even among type professionals, there’s a growing acceptance that for most people, the terms font and typeface can be used interchangeably”. So ‘fonts’ it is from here on in.

How do we help our clients?

The Wordbank Print Media team, have a real passion for all things font related. With this in mind I thought I would write a Blog to tell you how we help our clients choose the right fonts, that work and read correctly in each market.

Read more

17 September
2015

Managing Global Campaigns: A Cheat Sheet for U.S. Digital Agencies (Part 1 of 3)

By Forrest Dombrow | Global Marketing, PPC, SEO, Social Media, Uncategorized | Comments are off for this post

Guest post by former digital agency owner Forrest Dombrow of www.solvesales.com

The Tale of a Reluctant ‘Yes’
and 100 Sleepless Nights from
a Domestic Digital Agency Owner

global digital marketing frustration

I remember the phone call like it was yesterday.

In a previous life, I was a part-owner of a small but well-respected domestic digital agency with some well-known global clients.

I suddenly found myself on the phone with our largest customer asking if we could set up and manage Google AdWords in France.

If I said no, we could lose the entire account.

Nervous silence. Gulp. “Ahh. Umm. Sure . . . we can do that.”

Disaster averted – or so I thought. Read more

14 September
2015

7 Best Practices for Agile Localization

By Jenna Harding | Best Practices, Technology, Uncategorized | Comments are off for this post

Agile Process

Agile localization involves incorporating internationalization, localization, and translation into an agile product development cycle. It requires adapting localization processes to be fast, flexible, and automated. Software development teams moving from a traditional waterfall approach to agile methodologies may feel daunted about approaching the “localization issue” while also undergoing such a critical paradigm shift in their internal processes.

Some companies attempt to maintain the waterfall approach to localization even after switching to agile methodologies. In these cases, they translate all release content in a rush at the very end of a sprint, potentially even releasing globally weeks after they go live domestically. Other companies end up avoiding localization altogether, ignoring international users and forgoing a great deal of global opportunity. Read more

3 August
2015

7 Traits of an Effective In-Country Reviewer

By Jenna Harding | Best Practices, Branding, Global Marketing, Quality Assurance | Comments are off for this post

in_country_review_red_pen_500x334

Finding resources to review translations in global regions is a challenge for companies of all shapes and sizes. Top-notch, in-country reviewers are hard to find. Most individuals tasked with translation reviews already have full-time jobs, may not be language or subject-matter experts, and often feel as though extra work has been dumped upon them for no benefit of their own. The result is often subpar or uninformed review feedback, as well as project delays due to schedule conflicts and disenchanted reviewers.

However, while finding engaged, effective, in-country reviewers presents a challenge, it’s not impossible. We’ve identified seven core characteristics that make up a quality global review resource. The ideal individual should be:

1. A native speaker

You may have contacts who live down the street and speak French as a second language. Why can’t they perform the French reviews of your content? Well, are they experts in your industry, niche, and/or vertical? Are they up to speed on current language use and cultural nuances in your space? Have they spent significant time in France consistently over the past several years? Likely the answer to all of these questions is “no.” To ensure your communications are disseminated using the current, accurate voice for your brand and industry in the target market, it’s important your reviewers not only live in the target region, but are also native speakers of the local language and have a deep understanding of the market and your brand.
Read more

Older posts